Posts Tagged ‘wildlife’

10 awesome animal charities you might not know about

Some animal charities get all the attention—Best Friends Animal Society, The Gentle Barn, the WWF—and for good reason. But there are also plenty of other revolutionary individuals dedicating their inspiration and perspiration to helping animals in unique ways and truly making a difference in animals’ lives. Here, I spotlight a few pioneering animal charities and cutting-edge programs that you might not know about:

1. Wildlife Rescue Nests partners with knitters and crocheters to create warm, handmade nests that are then donated to wildlife rescues worldwide. Here’s a helpful video on how to knit a nest for baby birds, bunnies and other creatures in need:

These celebrities are making this world a better place

I typically don’t care much about celebrities; I don’t follow the gossip mags or obsess over who’s wearing what or who won which award. But when people (famous or otherwise) do wonderful things to help animals, I take notice. Here are five creative and inspiring celebrities helping animals in need—and using their fortunes, connections and popularity to make our world a better place:

Pamela Anderson: For those of us who have sworn off UGGs forever, look at these beautiful and warm “shearling”-style boots that are vegan, water-resistant and washable—and designed by model and actress Anderson. According to her new site, PAMMIES, “Our message is … Compassion is sexy.” Orders start shipping this month, with free U.S. shipping until December 31.

How to help California’s wildlife threatened by the drought

Living in Northern California, I can tell you the drought has been really difficult on everyone this year—not just the state’s 40 million residents, but California’s wildlife as well. It actually breaks my heart to think of all of the thirsty animals, and to read about their struggles in the news.

The drought has killed 12 million trees in California’s forests—just imagine all the animals who called these forests home. They now have to find a new place to live, and new places to hide from predators. A lot of them aren’t going to make it. The lack of water poses another challenge as well: As animals search far and wide for water sources, we’re more likely to see coyotes, mountain lions and even bears running through (and looking for food and water in) our neighborhoods. But it’s not just happening in forests: Even the iconic desert Joshua Trees are declining.

Marshes and wetlands and rivers are drying up, and the snow pack is a tiny percentage of what it should be, affecting not just fish populations but also the birds and other creatures who use those areas as a hunting source. This article details the historic drought’s severe impact on the state’s birds. Even hummingbirds, my favorites, are also at risk. They love nectar, but our dried-up hills are no longer blanketed with wildflowers. Mammals like squirrels and baby deer are starving.

More California sea lions and pups are stranding on beaches. Even the adorable giant kangaroo rat, so essential to the state’s ecosystem, is in danger. When grasslands dry up, and mice and other small mammals have nowhere to go, there are ripple effects: Barn owls and raptors also struggle to survive. The animals are in crisis. So what can we do?

On an individual scale, there’s not a whole lot we can do, but because I don’t like to feel helpless and do nothing, here are three small things I can do to make me feel a little bit better—and really, these are things we can all do, and the bonus is they’re both easy and affordable (and two of these tips don’t even require you to live in California!):

1. Dedicate your morning meditation to the animals. I’ve talked about this before. When my beloved dog Dakota died and I felt at a complete loss over how to recover from his passing, I began to dedicate my meditations to him, and it helped me immensely. You can always dedicate your meditations to your favorite animal, by your side or across the Rainbow Bridge—and even to the animals you care about that are threatened right now with the drought crisis in California. I have found that choosing a meaningful focus for your meditations can actually strengthen them.

2. Provide a food and water source for birds in your backyard. This is easy to do, but so helpful! Seeds can help to sustain birds that can’t find food elsewhere. A bird bath kept clean with fresh water helps them stay hydrated during these hot, dry months. Black oil sunflower seeds, which can be found at most grocery stores and pet stores, are best. (Squirrels and chipmunks like these seeds, too.) You can also landscape with native plants that attract bees, birds and insects and provide a much-needed habitat for them.

3. Donate to the organizations that are helping wildlife in California. Even a small donation in your eyes is a huge help to these organizations. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but the following are great nonprofits working to help the state’s threatened animals: The Marine Mammal Center, WildCare, Earthwatch and Audubon California.

Do you have any additional tips to add? How can we continue to support the animals in California affected by the drought?

Live sustainably, protect habitats

I was stunned recently to hear the following statistic: In order to survive, the United States will need 5.3 planet Earths if we continue using up natural resources at the rate we are now. In the UK, that number is 3.5 Earths, according to the World Wildlife Fund.

“Unless we change our lifestyle into a One Planet lifestyle, then we’re going to be in trouble,” says Richard Pope, who serves on the Expert Panel for environmental charity Bioregional‘s One Planet Living initiative and has 25 years’ experience in residential master plans, as well as 10 years’ experience in sustainable/green building. “Sooner or later, we’re going to run out of resources if we keep using them at the rate we are now.”

If any of you have taken my sister Kathleen’s animal Reiki classes at BrightHaven Healing Arts Center for Animals, you may have actually had the opportunity to meet Richard—he’s also the co-founder, with his wife, Gail, of the holistic hospice/sanctuary for animals in Sebastopol, California.

Bioregional is hoping to make sustainable living easy, attainable and attractive for everyone. They’re already starting: A 200-acre site in Rohnert Park, California, with 1,800 residential units and commercial space (including a business incubator for social and sustainable startups) is already underway. Richard is the development director for the site, called Sonoma Mountain Village. It’s also North America’s first fully certified One Planet Living Community—and has a waiting list 2,000 people long.

But what does One Planet Living actually mean? According to Bioregional, it means to live sustainably according to the following 10 guiding principles (born from a collaboration with WWF): zero carbon, zero waste, sustainable transport, local and sustainable materials and food, sustainable water, culture and heritage, equity and fair trade, health and happiness, and natural habitats and wildlife.

Protecting wildlife

The issue of natural habitats and wildlife is particularly close to Kathleen’s heart and her work with Animal Reiki Source. And thankfully, Bioregional works hard to protect biodiversity. Under the guiding principles, if you harm a habitat by building a community, you have to regenerate that habitat and integrate it into the new environment. “It’s not just go in there and bulldoze the land,” says Richard.

Blue Sky Coyote

The ideal of One Planet Living sounds wonderful, but is it possible? “The inspiring thing is, once people have the opportunity to do it, they do it,” says Richard, adding that these communities are replicable. “If you say to someone, ‘You’ll have cheaper utility bills, your friends will love it, it’s within walking distance of your work and schools and restaurants, recreation, and you can save the world at the same time.’ Why wouldn’t you buy there?” These communities show it truly is possible to live in such a way that we only require one planet.

Businesses and communities can take a step in the right direction by following the 10 principles and getting certified by Bioregional. For individuals like the rest of us, a good start is to calculate your environmental footprint (Bioregional provides this handy calculator) and make changes accordingly—for instance, eat local, recycle, protect animals, walk or bike if possible, and cease the use of heavy insecticides. And if you’re a jet-setter, you can buy carbon offsets so that flight to London is slightly less damaging to the environment.

“There’s a change coming,” says Richard. “There’s going to be a great squeeze upwards in the next generation who demand to live in a lifestyle that doesn’t hurt the planet.” Just don’t expect the greening of America—and the world—to happen overnight. “I guess we’re the trailblazers,” he adds. “If we do this and show it’s successful, then everyone will start doing it.” One can only hope.

{P.S. 10 sustainable (and beautifully designed!) homes via Gizmag.}