Posts Tagged ‘easy’

Best holistic treatments for animals

My life’s work literally is animal Reiki—coaching animal lovers worldwide on their journey toward peace and wellness. But Reiki is not the only natural treatment out there for our beloved animals. In fact, Reiki is a great complementary therapy to not only Western veterinary medicine, but also a whole host of holistic and natural options, including the three listed below. Tell me, have you given any of these a try?

Acupuncture: My last dog, Dakota, benefited greatly from acupuncture treatments, which work by restoring balance. When he was in hospice, acupuncture allowed him to use his back legs to walk a bit longer than would have otherwise been possible.  And amazingly, animals don’t seem to mind getting stuck by dozens of needles. They just “go to sleep,” says veterinarian Nicole Kayser in this informative article from Ithaca.com. To find a holistic vet near you who offers acupuncture or other healing modality, try this helpful search function from the American Holistic Veterinary Medical Association.

Aromatherapy: Animals have a keen sense of smell, and humans who swear by aromatherapy for their dog or horse say it does wonders for stress, their immune system, motion sickness, skin rashes, hyperactivity and more. But essential oils should be used cautiously, so always work in tandem with your vet and also read up on the subject. The comprehensive guide Holistic Aromatherapy for Animals by Kristen Lee Bell and this article in Huffington Post are good places to start.

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Natural and herbal remedies: Fleas, stress, dry skin, tummy troubles, hairballs and more can often be handled by homemade or natural remedies. This article runs down 21 surprisingly easy natural and herbal remedies for common maladies; and, of course, Dr. Pitcairn’s Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs & Cats should reside on every animal lover’s bookshelf.

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What are your favorite natural remedies?

Easiest homemade dog treats

I was in the kitchen the other day whipping up a gluten- and dairy-free meal for my family when it occurred to me: Shouldn’t I also be cooking up some healthy treats for our dog, Mystic? After all, the dog snacks you buy in stores have the same problems as the prepackaged foods we humans often buy for ourselves: dyes, preservatives and unpronounceable ingredients.

Homemade dog treats, on the other hand, are healthier, made from wholesome ingredients, and I’m guessing they taste better, too! (I admit, I haven’t tasted her dog treats myself—but who can argue that fresh ingredients are going to taste better than processed ones? Which do you prefer: fresh brownies or store-bought? … Hm, I rest my case.)