Posts Tagged ‘birds’

10 fun ways to spread happiness to animals

Tomorrow is April 22—and millions of people worldwide will come together to celebrate Earth Day, the annual event born in 1970 to highlight support for important environmental causes. Will you be celebrating? You can do a Google search to find local Earth Day events near you, or even search this map on the official Earth Day website for ideas.

Since we share our planet with animals, I’m going to celebrate Earth Day tomorrow by spreading happiness to animals. How am I going to accomplish that, you may ask? Here are 10 fun ways:

How to help California’s wildlife threatened by the drought

Living in Northern California, I can tell you the drought has been really difficult on everyone this year—not just the state’s 40 million residents, but California’s wildlife as well. It actually breaks my heart to think of all of the thirsty animals, and to read about their struggles in the news.

The drought has killed 12 million trees in California’s forests—just imagine all the animals who called these forests home. They now have to find a new place to live, and new places to hide from predators. A lot of them aren’t going to make it. The lack of water poses another challenge as well: As animals search far and wide for water sources, we’re more likely to see coyotes, mountain lions and even bears running through (and looking for food and water in) our neighborhoods. But it’s not just happening in forests: Even the iconic desert Joshua Trees are declining.

Marshes and wetlands and rivers are drying up, and the snow pack is a tiny percentage of what it should be, affecting not just fish populations but also the birds and other creatures who use those areas as a hunting source. This article details the historic drought’s severe impact on the state’s birds. Even hummingbirds, my favorites, are also at risk. They love nectar, but our dried-up hills are no longer blanketed with wildflowers. Mammals like squirrels and baby deer are starving.

More California sea lions and pups are stranding on beaches. Even the adorable giant kangaroo rat, so essential to the state’s ecosystem, is in danger. When grasslands dry up, and mice and other small mammals have nowhere to go, there are ripple effects: Barn owls and raptors also struggle to survive. The animals are in crisis. So what can we do?

On an individual scale, there’s not a whole lot we can do, but because I don’t like to feel helpless and do nothing, here are three small things I can do to make me feel a little bit better—and really, these are things we can all do, and the bonus is they’re both easy and affordable (and two of these tips don’t even require you to live in California!):

1. Dedicate your morning meditation to the animals. I’ve talked about this before. When my beloved dog Dakota died and I felt at a complete loss over how to recover from his passing, I began to dedicate my meditations to him, and it helped me immensely. You can always dedicate your meditations to your favorite animal, by your side or across the Rainbow Bridge—and even to the animals you care about that are threatened right now with the drought crisis in California. I have found that choosing a meaningful focus for your meditations can actually strengthen them.

2. Provide a food and water source for birds in your backyard. This is easy to do, but so helpful! Seeds can help to sustain birds that can’t find food elsewhere. A bird bath kept clean with fresh water helps them stay hydrated during these hot, dry months. Black oil sunflower seeds, which can be found at most grocery stores and pet stores, are best. (Squirrels and chipmunks like these seeds, too.) You can also landscape with native plants that attract bees, birds and insects and provide a much-needed habitat for them.

3. Donate to the organizations that are helping wildlife in California. Even a small donation in your eyes is a huge help to these organizations. This is by no means an exhaustive list, but the following are great nonprofits working to help the state’s threatened animals: The Marine Mammal Center, WildCare, Earthwatch and Audubon California.

Do you have any additional tips to add? How can we continue to support the animals in California affected by the drought?

Can meditation boost your career?

Friends, what are you up to this weekend? I am excited to be teaching a Reiki III class at Brighthaven over the next three days. As I prepare for my class, here are five things I’m feeling grateful for today …

1. Have you tried meditation? I meditate every single day and feel I would be lost without it. I’ve found that meditation helps me feel centered, connected and energized, not just in business but also with my family. And I’m not the only one: Apparently Jerry Seinfeld swears by twice-daily meditation, and even executives and tech entrepreneurs are starting to turn to meditation to boost their careers, packing increasingly popular meditation classes and conducting “mindful networking.” For some extra inspiration in your meditation practice, here are some helpful apps for meditation and mindfulness.

2. Art that honors animals: If you are lucky enough to live in London, the Here Today … exhibition at The Sorting Office is a must-see. The exhibition, which runs until December 17, explores eight different “chapters” related to environmental challenges, including “Human Footprint,” “Climate Change and Loss of Habitat” and “The Hunted.” Chapter 1 features a stunning series by Andy Warhol called Endangered Species, which he created in 1983 to highlight the plight of endangered animals.

Pop art illustration with colorful butterflies

Pop art butterflies

3. The backyard birds that tough it out through even the coldest of winters. But if you have a feeder, do you know the most nutritious seed to feed them? (Hint: It’s not the cheap bag of “filler seeds” you commonly find at the store.)

4. Innovators who rethink mundane objects in life-changing ways. I never even thought about this before, but imagine an eco-friendly alternative to the tea kettle that saves energy and doesn’t waste water! As designer and sustainability strategist Leyla Acaroglu pointed out in her 2013 TED talk, most people (65 percent of Brits surveyed) boil more water than needed in their teakettles. That wasted energy could literally light the streetlights of England for a night, Acaroglu says. The Miito rectifies that problem and just might replace the kettle someday.

5. The stack of books at my bedside that I can’t wait to read. I just finished Tina Fey’s Bossypants (loved it!). Next on my list: Angry Optimist: The Life and Times of Jon Stewart by Lisa Rogak. Here’s a cool list of 11 other cozy winter reads.